Beese Eats: KITH and KIN

     Beese Eats: KITH and KIN | Adebisi AdebowaleA recipe has no soul. You, as the cook, must bring soul to the recipe. – Thomas Keller

Estimated time to read: 4 minutes

Last weekend, I had such an amazing time celebrating my 10-year Deltaversary (read 10-year Delta anniversary) with my line sisters (read: the women whom I gained membership with at the same time into Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.) in Washington, DC, where it all began for us. We went all over the District touring (the new changes that has happened or been created in the time some of us have not be in town), catching up, celebrating each other’s wins, and counseling, advising and talking through upcoming, future plans.

 

As we were planning for this reunion, we heard the buzz around the new restaurant – KITH & KIN – that had come to town and we just had to go there for our bougie dinner on our second night in town. It is an Afro-Caribbean fusion restaurant located on the waterfront in District Wharf area of D.C.

Beese Eats: KITH and KIN | Adebisi Adebowale

The restaurant seems to be designed for intimate, quaint get-togethers, so it does not take accommodate parties larger than six. However, we were a party of ten and the amazing staff allowed us to dine at two tables parallel to each other (one of six, the other of four) so that we could still have our cozy, sisterly dinner together.

 

Now given the fact I am about all things Jollof, when I saw that they served it, I just had to try the Jollof Rice KITH & KIN had to offer … not just for me, but for you all. To say the very least – the rice was NOT good! Like at all. It tasted as if it was cooked in … orange juice – just so it could give the rice an orange tint.

 

I was highly disappointed and turned off from what they had classified as West African (because it is a West African dish staple) Jollof Rice in an Afro-Caribbean restaurant. KITH & KIN is a restaurant created by a man of African decent, and while I understand fusion means blending [cultural influences into a uniform taste], the taste of this Jollof Rice was ssooo far off from the traditional Jollof style of Ghana, Senegal, Sierra Leone, or Nigeria (where Chef Kwame’s roots are). And let me add in my fellow countrymen’s defense – this is not indicative of Naija Jollof AT ALL!

 

My concern with diluting the authenticity of flavors is that when people [with untrained tongues] want to have a[nother] Jollof day at what may be a more authentic restaurant or even somewhere in the motherland itself, said person may be shocked by the drastic difference in the seasoning – not being able to decipher the true authentic taste of the food.

 

Needless to say, if you are excited or interested in going to KITH & KIN you are not going for authentic Afro-Caribbean food. You are going for the ambience and experience of feeling and looking a little bougie on the waterfront of Washington, D.C. I would recommend trying something more simple or everyday while at the restaurant to avoid any disappointment.

Beese Eats: KITH and KIN | Adebisi Adebowale

Have you been to KITH & KIN yet? If so, what did you think of the food you had there? Let me know your thoughts below!

Check out this teal and burgundy dress here designed by your truly and sewed by House of Faye. It could be yours? If you have not read yet, I am giving away 30 pieces of my Ankara wardrobe in my Beese’s Pieces Wakanda Month-long Celebration for my 30th birthday in November. Subscribe to the blog below and follow me on Instagram to enter to win.

xo

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